Hangar Door Configuration

When we talk about a hangar door configuration, we mean the way in which the door will open and close.

We already know that the door opens horizontally, but the format can vary depending on the needs of the customer and the width of the building.

It’s our recommendation that you call us so we can help determine the right choice for you.

Unidirectional

When the hangar door opens, the door panels slide to one side.

Your aircraft hangar only requires pocket space on one side of the opening. (The pocket is where the door panels stack when the door is open.)

The unidirectional design is typically the least expensive hangar door configuration. An explanation for this would be the smallest amount of electrical components required to operate it.

Unidirectional hangar door configuration

This hangar door configuration is also commonly known as “single slide” or “one direction”.

Bi-Parting

When the hangar door opens, half the door panels slide to the left and half slide to the right.

Your aircraft hangar requires pocket space on both sides of the opening. (The pocket is where the door panels stack when the door is open.)

The bi-parting door design is arguably the most common hangar door configuration.

The cost of a bi-parting door design is dependent on how wide the building is. If the building is quite narrow then you’ll need to make a financial allowance for adding pockets like we see in the example on the right. (The pocket is where the door panels stack when the door is open.)

If the building is much wider than the door opening you wont need to worry about pocket space.

Biparting hangar door configuration

Group Movement

Here there will be a motor on the first panel and the last panel. The door moves in a group.

There can be one group or multiple groups.

Where we previously talked about there being a need for a pocket for the panels to stack when the door is open, with group movement you have the option of eradicating the pocket and building a more efficient aircraft hangar.

Of course if you need pockets, you can have them. (The pocket is where the door panels stack when the door is open. Either one, or both sides of the door opening)

A group movement configuration will cost you more up front because it requires more materials and electrical components than the two doors we’ve already presented.

However cost isn’t everything and this configuration could become your best friend if it allows you to reduce design costs or increase functionality.

Unidirectional hangar door configuration

Group movement; available in one group, or multiple groups.

Independent

Each door panel moves independently. 

This configuration is for clients who want to maneuver aircraft in and out of the aircraft hangar without moving more door panels than necessary.

While this configuration is suitable for almost any project it’s commonly specified on buildings associated with military jets, jumbo jets, rockets and boats.

In most instances this shall be considered the most expensive choice because each door panel has it’s own electrical operator. On that note remember the more door panels there is, the more expensive the door becomes.

However cost isn’t everything and this configuration could become your best friend if it allows you to reduce design costs or increase functionality.